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Data from: Tail loss and telomeres: consequences of large-scale tissue regeneration in a terrestrial ectotherm.

Citation

Fitzpatrick, Luisa et al. (2019), Data from: Tail loss and telomeres: consequences of large-scale tissue regeneration in a terrestrial ectotherm., Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.n6n6495

Abstract

Large-scale tissue regeneration has potential consequences for telomere length through increases in cell division and changes in metabolism which increase the potential for oxidative stress damage to telomeres. The effects of regeneration on telomere dynamics have been studied in fish and marine invertebrates, but the literature is scarce for terrestrial species. We experimentally induced tail autotomy in a lizard (Niveoscincus ocellatus) and assessed relative telomere length (RTL) in blood samples before and after partial tail regeneration while concurrently measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. The change in ROS levels was a significant explanatory variable for the change in RTL over the sixty-day experiment. At the average value of ROS change, the mean RTL increased significantly in the control group (intact tails), but there was no such evidence in the regenerating group. In contrast, ROS levels decreased significantly in the regenerating group, but there was no such evidence in the control group. Combined, these results suggest that tail regeneration following autotomy involves a response to oxidative stress and this potentially comes at a cost to telomere repair. This change in telomere maintenance demonstrates a potential long-term cost of tail regeneration beyond the re-growth of tissue itself.

Usage Notes

Location

Tasmania