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Data from: Retention of learned predator recognition in embryonic and juvenile rainbow trout

Citation

Horn, Marianna; Ferrari, Maud; Chivers, Douglas (2019), Data from: Retention of learned predator recognition in embryonic and juvenile rainbow trout, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q5s6298

Abstract

Minimizing predation risk, especially for young or naïve individuals, can be achieved by learning to recognize predators. Embryonic learning may optimize survival by allowing for the earliest possible response to predation threats post-hatch. However, predatory threats often change over an individual’s lifetime, and using old information can be detrimental if it becomes outdated. Adaptive forgetting allows an individual to discount obsolete information in decision-making, and instead emphasize newer, more relevant information when responding to predation threats. Little is known about the extent to which young individuals can learn and forget information about predation threats. Here we demonstrate that rainbow trout 1) are capable of learning from both conspecific and heterospecific alarm cues as embryos, newly-hatched and free swimming larvae, 2) exhibit adaptive forgetting of predator information at all stages, and 3) display dynamic adaptive forgetting based on the ontogeny of learning. Specifically, fish that learned information as embryos retained that information for longer periods than those that learned the same information as newly-hatched alevins.

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