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Data from: Divergent plant–soil feedbacks could alter future elevation ranges and ecosystem dynamics

Citation

Van Nuland, Michael E.; Bailey, Joseph K.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A. (2018), Data from: Divergent plant–soil feedbacks could alter future elevation ranges and ecosystem dynamics, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.s5j72

Abstract

Plant–soil feedbacks (PSF) are important interactions that may influence range dynamics in a changing world. What remains largely unknown is the generality of plant–soil biotic interactions across populations and the potential role of specific soil biota, both of which are key for understanding how PSF might change future communities and ecosystems. We combined landscape-level field observations and experimental soil treatments to test whether a dominant tree alters soil environments to impact its own performance and range shifts towards higher elevations. We show: (1) soil conditioning by trees varies with elevation, (2) soil biota relate to PSF, (3) under simulated conditions, biotic PSF constrain range shifts at lower elevations but allow for expansions at higher elevations, and (4) differences in soil conditioning predict feedback outcomes in specific range-shift scenarios. These results suggest that variable plant–soil biotic interactions may influence the migration and fragmentation of tree species, and that models incorporating soil parameters will more accurately predict future species distributions.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DGE-0929298

References